Wednesday, September 10, 2014

BBC News - Publisher defends 'creepy' Roald Dahl book cover

BBC News - Publisher defends 'creepy' Roald Dahl book cover



New cover for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

A very made up young girl, blonde hair, long curls, pink ribbon and feathery boa.

The publisher says the image is 'not intended to represent either' of the two female children characters in the book.

Well then, WTF? If it's not supposed to represent a character in the book, what is it's purpose.  Shouldn't a cover in some way reflect the actual story its covering?





But Penguin said it stressed "the light and the dark aspects" of Dahl's work.


"This design is in recognition of the book's extraordinary
cultural impact and is one of the few children's books to be featured in
the Penguin Modern Classics list.


"This new image for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory looks
at the children at the centre of the story, and highlights the way Roald
Dahl's writing manages to embrace both the light and the dark aspects
of life," said a statement from Penguin


Please make up your mind, Penguin.  The image looks at the children at the centre of the story, but it's not meant to be a picture of any specific child from the story? What does that mean?

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